Helping Disadvantaged Youth Succeed in School: Second-Year Findings from a Longitudinal Study of CTE-Based Whole-School Reforms

Helping Disadvantaged Youth Succeed in School: Second-Year Findings from a Longitudinal Study of CTE-Based Whole-School Reforms

Mar 2002

Authors:

Marisa Castellano
Samuel Stringfield
Johns Hopkins University

James R. Stone III
University of Minnesota

Executive Summary:

This report provides second-year findings from a 5-year longitudinal study. The study examines diverse and promising programs for integrating career and technical education (CTE, previously called vocational education) with whole-school reforms in schools that serve predominantly disadvantaged students. We define disadvantaged students as those living in poverty (indexed by participation in the federal free and reduced-price lunch program), and those who are members of groups that have been historically discriminated against in U.S. society (African Americans, Hispanics, and immigrants groups for whom English is not their native language). This interim report begins the process of providing longitudinal descriptions of CTE-enhanced whole-school reforms that appear to have strong track records of improving the educational chances of concentrated groups of highly disadvantaged students.

The larger study of which this report is a part asks several questions, two of which are addressed in this report:

  1. How have comprehensive school reform models affected CTE and overall education in middle schools and high schools—especially those that serve large disadvantaged populations?
  2. How do students choose the career and technical concentration they will pursue for their high school years? Are issues of equity (e.g., encouraging nontraditional career choices, preventing CTE from becoming a dumping ground for low-achieving at-risk students) considered in the structuring of this choice?

More

 

Castellano, M., Stringfield, S., & Stone, J. R., III. (2002, March). Helping disadvantaged youth succeed in school: Second-year findings from a longitudinal study of CTE-based whole-school reforms. St. Paul, MN: National Research Center for Career and Technical Education, University of Minnesota.